Fire and Water: Pele, and Hi'iaka

Pele and her sister are in the family line is Hiʻiaka, and they take on the task of bearing the clouds, providing rain, thunder and lightning variously, those of storms and those produced by Pele's volcanoes. Hiʻiaka lived in a grove of Lehua trees which are sacred to her where she spent her days dancing with the forest spirits. 

Wai OlaWater of Life Life for Hawaiians is centered on water and agriculture (land). Early on, the most important food staple at that time was kalo (taro), which relied heavily on the mana (life-force) and is considered ʻohana (family) to the Hawaiians. The mana of the water was established through attentive cleanliness of the river ways by ceremony, which included pule (prayers) by the villagers. These ceremonies and prayers are important in maintaining a positive relationship between land and water, which led to the same relationship to all Kanaka Maoli (native Hawaiians).

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